Tag Archives: Fast Company

The 5 Questions Every Company Should Ask Itself (via Fast Company)


Question Mark on Road (ahead)This is a RT via @FastCompany.  If you’re not following Fast Company, you should do it right away.  It represents some of the best and brightest business thinking out there and has wonderful content.  This article is no exception, and really gets you thinking about some fundamentals about your business… ://t.co/5lCsLebn9q

*Spoiler Alert* Here are the questions.  You’ll need to read the article for the context:

  1. What is our company’s purpose on this Earth?
  2. What should we STOP doing?
  3. If we didn’t have an existing business, how could we best build a new one?
  4. Where is our petri dish?
  5. How can we make a better experiment?
Advertisements

Jet (Black and) Blue Pushes Back…


Fresh from the front pages…

Unless you’re dead or off the power grid, you may have heard the story of the flight attendant turned emergency-ramp-escapee Steven Slater, a huge PR fiasco for Jet Blue exploding all over the internet.

But, as covered in a Fast Company article by David Zax this morning,  in a sign that major companies are learning to flex their new social media muscles to leverage perception in the marketplace and not just be ruled by it, Jet Blue responded in a simple blog entry that many are crediting for turning the tide on their perceived role in this mess. 

Think of it – for virtually NO COST – and in a few pithy sentences, a major up-and-coming airline changed the prevailing winds of public perception fueled by a (albeit completely overblown) major news story.

That’s an interesting power that did not exist even 24 months ago

Please lower your tray tables, fasten your seatbelts, and prepare for takeoff…

Neuroeconomics – Social Networking “Feels” Like Falling in Love


Fresh from the July issue of Fast Company comes this fascinating article that should make all marketers think when it comes to their use of social media in their marketing mix.   Citation: This post is a direct summary of Fast Company’s excellent article by Adam L. Penenberg (who’s other work you should check out immediately).

Paul J. Zak, a.k.a “Dr. Love,” is a professor at Claremont Graduate University who popularized “neuroeconomics,” an emerging field that combines economics with biology, neuroscience, and psychology. 

His angle? Some best-selling behavioral economists such as Dan Ariely (Predictably Irrational) and Steven D. Levitt (half of the Freakonomics duo) ponder how we make economic decisions.  Zak wants to figure out why we do what we do.                                    

 In a word – “Oxytocin.”

“…Known for years as the hormone forging the unshakable bond between mothers and their babies, oxytocin is now, thanks largely to Zak, recognized as the human stimulant of empathy, generosity, trust, and more. It is, Zak says, the “social glue” that adheres families, communities, and societies, and as such, acts as an “economic lubricant” that enables us to engage in all sorts of transactions…”

 “…Your brain interpreted tweeting as if you were directly interacting with people you cared about or had empathy for,” Zak says. “E-connection is processed in the brain like an in-person connection…”

“…In a world of social networks, then, this much seems clear: Companies that can connect with us and raise our oxytocin levels should prosper. Those that can’t, won’t…”

Very interesting…

How big is Social Media?…How big is Google?


Big news.  I just got this from a friend at 7Summits.  According to Fast Company Magazine (a must subscribe if you don’t already), Hitwise analysis says that as of this month, “…Google lost its crown as the most-visited Web site in the U.S. last week. The new king of Web site traffic is, of course, Facebook…”  That is how important social media has become.  Just a year or two ago this would not have seemed possible.   Fast Company predicts an Ad War.  Be looking for more ads in your Facebook pages as companies start to divide their spend amongst these two giant aggregators.  How seriously are you focusing your marketing plan on either of them?

Measuring Marketing


Great blog post from the folks at Fast Company:  http://bit.ly/97qnIl.   This magazine is very good.  One of my top resources for business insight.  This post deals with that age-old question, “What are we getting for our marketing spend?”  My firm is doing a better job tacking lead source per deal – in a direct answer to one of the questions posed in the post “From ‘closed business’ where did the initial leads come from?”  It’s making a difference in how we invest dollars in marketing.  Have you connected the dots at your company?